Vanessa Gardner Nagel chirps about garden design

Payday Loans Payday Loans

Learning from Garden Shows-Part 1

At this time of year, garden shows are in abundance. The Northwest Flower and Garden Show has already been tucked away until next year, with two Portland shows about to happen over the next two weeks. The granddaddy, The Philadelphia Flower Show, begins Feb. 28. 

Seeing something new is what I yearn to see as a landscape designer, but I also enjoy things I have seen if they are done superbly. As for the awards, I think the judges were spot on in their judgment this year. Also, I found this year’s gardens more difficult to photograph than ever before and I think it was because many designers didn’t consider backdrop (as in protecting the viewer from the marketplace beyond or ugly walls) and reflections (particularly of the overhead show lights in the adjacent marketplace); so my profuse apologies for out-of-focus photographs. Here’s what was most interesting to me at the Northwest Flower and Garden Show:

ART-itecture for Urban Wildlife, design by Susie Thompson and Lisa Bauer for APLD WA chapter Lisa Bauer’s highly creative birdhouses were the focus of this garden. The rhythm of red posts unified both the garden and the distinctly different architecture of each birdhouse. The sculpture of a bird sitting atop an egg pyramid entitled ‘Over-Achiever’, also tickled my funny bone.

ART-itecture for Urban Wildlife, design by Susie Thompson and Lisa Bauer for APLD WA chapter
Lisa Bauer’s highly creative birdhouses were the focus of this garden. The rhythm of red posts unified both the garden and the distinctly different architecture of each birdhouse. The sculpture of a bird sitting atop an egg pyramid entitled ‘Over-Achiever’, also tickled my funny bone.

The Art of Upcycling, design by Vanca Lumsden and Judith Jones Vanca Lumsden’s handcrafted prayer flags were the most notable element in this garden because of their strong repetition of form and color. It’s too bad the backdrop did not show them to better advantage.

The Art of Upcycling, design by Vanca Lumsden and Judith Jones
Vanca Lumsden’s handcrafted prayer flags were the most notable element in this garden because of their strong repetition of form and color. It’s too bad the backdrop did not show them to better advantage.

Peace in Motion – Sanctuary of Peace, design by Iftikar Ahmed Because of the repetition of form, this garden’s most notable elements were the prayer wheels, designed and fabricated by Axis of Hope, that marched us towards the key focal point, a large Buddha sculpture.

Peace in Motion – Sanctuary of Peace, design by Iftikar Ahmed
Because of the repetition of form, this garden’s most notable elements were the prayer wheels, designed and fabricated by Axis of Hope, that marched us towards the key focal point, a large Buddha sculpture.

In Our Hands, design by Anthony Fajarillo Very clever idea: fingerprints represented with recycled plastic bag-wrapped wire.

In Our Hands, design by Anthony Fajarillo
Very clever idea: fingerprints represented with recycled plastic bag-wrapped wire.

In Our Hands, design by Anthony Fajarillo Also in this garden two pieces of noteworthy art that I think went well together, even if other components in the garden was a bit dissonant (particularly the gates): PNW Native American sculpture and an intriguing trompe-l’oeil on the floor.

In Our Hands, design by Anthony Fajarillo
Also in this garden two pieces of noteworthy art that I think went well together, even if other components in the garden was a bit dissonant (particularly the gates): PNW Native American sculpture and an intriguing trompe-l’oeil on the floor.

Terra Cadence, design by Susan Calhoun Photographing this garden as a whole was ridiculously difficult so here are two components: The rill that lead down to the small water fall through an all-white flower garden which kept the garden calm and simple and allowed us to appreciate the spectacular focal point centered above the rill at the back of the garden: an original glass chandelier.

Terra Cadence, design by Susan Calhoun
Photographing this garden as a whole was ridiculously difficult so here is the best overall shot I could get. The rill that lead down to the small water fall through an all-white flower garden which kept the garden calm and simple and allowed us to appreciate the spectacular focal point centered above the rill at the back of the garden: an original glass chandelier.

Closeup of the glass chandelier.

Closeup of the glass chandelier.

Darwin’s Muse - Art Imitating Life, design by Karen Stefonick Wisely simple in concept, with strong repetition of color and form kept this garden very cohesive. The gorgeous glass pitcher ‘plants’ echoed Sarracenia plants incorporated into the garden.

Darwin’s Muse – Art Imitating Life, design by Karen Stefonick
Wisely simple in concept, with strong repetition of color and form kept this garden very cohesive. The gorgeous glass pitcher ‘plants’ echoed Sarracenia plants incorporated into the garden. One note: In a real garden, these would need to be put under cover in some fashion.

Darwin’s Muse - Art Imitating Life, design by Karen Stefonick A glass greenhouse provided a focal point orchid above.

Darwin’s Muse – Art Imitating Life, design by Karen Stefonick
A glass greenhouse provided a focal point orchid above.

Bridge Garden, design by Pot Incorporated One of the tiny gardens on the bridge, this designer featured creative pots and dynamite-looking succulents surrounding a simple ‘deck’ chair.

Bridge Garden, design by Pot Incorporated
One of the tiny gardens on the bridge, this designer featured creative pots and dynamite-looking succulents surrounding a simple ‘deck’ chair.

Stay tuned for part 2 of 4 garden shows.

Share

There are no comments yet. Be the first and leave a response!

Leave a Reply


Wanting to leave an <em>phasis on your comment?

Trackback URL http://seasonsgardendesign.com/GardenChirps/learning-from-garden-shows-part-1/trackback/